asylum-art
asylum-art:

Undulatus asperatus: Storm Chaser Captures Mesmerizing Time-Lapse of Clouds Rolling Like Ocean Waves
“Undulatus asperatus” is a cloud formation proposed in 2009 that roughly translates to “roughened or agitated waves.” These dark and stormy clouds travel across the sky in ominous waves, but generally dissipate without an a storm forming.
Storm chaser Alex Schueth was recently in the right place at the right time with his DSLR, and managed to capture one of these formations in the mesmerizing time-lapse video seen above. Watch the video:

via (PetaPixel)

asylum-art:

Undulatus asperatus: Storm Chaser Captures Mesmerizing Time-Lapse of Clouds Rolling Like Ocean Waves

Undulatus asperatus” is a cloud formation proposed in 2009 that roughly translates to “roughened or agitated waves.” These dark and stormy clouds travel across the sky in ominous waves, but generally dissipate without an a storm forming.

Storm chaser Alex Schueth was recently in the right place at the right time with his DSLR, and managed to capture one of these formations in the mesmerizing time-lapse video seen above.

Watch the video:


via (PetaPixel)

futurescope

futurescope:

The Rochester “Invisibility” Cloack

Scientists at the University of Rochester have discovered a way to hide large objects from sight using inexpensive (less than $100) and readily available lenses.

invisible cloak

Snip from Reuters:

The so-called Rochester Cloak is not really a tangible cloak at all. Rather the device looks like equipment used by an optometrist. When an object is placed behind the layered lenses it seems to disappear.

Previous cloaking methods have been complicated, expensive, and not able to hide objects in three dimensions when viewed at varying angles, they say.

"From what, we know this is the first cloaking device that provides three-dimensional, continuously multidirectional cloaking," said Joseph Choi, a graduate student who helped develop the method at Rochester, which is renowned for its optical research.

In their tests, the researchers have cloaked a hand, a face, and a ruler – making each object appear “invisible” while the image behind the hidden object remains in view. The implications for the discovery are endless, they say.

"I imagine this could be used to cloak a trailer on the back of a semi-truck so the driver can see directly behind him," Choi said. "It can be used for surgery, in the military, in interior design, art."

Don’t miss the behind-the-pysics video from University Rochester: How Does Cloaking Work in the Real World?

[read more] [Rochester Quantum Optics Lab]
[Want to make your own? Here’s a tutorial] [picture by J. Adam Fenster / University of Rochester]

Nixie the “flying wristband” was developed by a team led by Christoph Kohstall using Intel’s Edison chip. Project manager Jelena Jovanovic says that the Nixie was designed because “[w]e all have moments we want to remember, we all have moments we want to capture, and maybe even to share them later. Nixie takes the picture that you wish you had always had, but couldn’t, because you didn’t want to stop the action.” (via This Is A Cute Bracelet! Oh, And It’s Also A Drone That Will Take Selfies For You In Mid-Air | The Mary Sue)

Western modernity is “the child of logos ” [the opposite of mythos in the Hellenistic tradition, it represents science and facts]. Science became the dominant paradigm for understanding the world. But logos alone is unable to give us a sense of significance – it was myth that gave life meaning and context. Thus society unconsciously cried out for and ultimately created its own myths around the newly dominant force of consumerism. This is why modern brands are more complex than their older counterparts, because the role of brands is changing to fulfill the need for myth. Logos led us to logos.